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 law: teaching, professions, organization 86.02

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  •  Title: Can legal research benefit from evaluation studies? trans
Author:  Frans L. Leeuw
Source:  Universiteit Utrecht
Published in:  Utrecht Law Review
Year:  2011
Description:  The article describes what evaluation studies have to offer to legal research. Several cases and types of evaluations are presented, in relation to legal or semi-legal questions. Also, a short overview of the contemporary history of evaluation studies is presented. Finally, it will address the question of how to ensure that in legal research and in legal training attention is paid to theories, designs and methods of evaluation studies.
  •  Title: How to carry out interdisciplinary legal research. Some experiences with an interdisciplinary research method trans
Author:  Wendy Schrama
Source:  Universiteit Utrecht
Published in:  Utrecht Law Review
Year:  2011
Description:  Interdisciplinary legal research, in which non-legal data are combined with legal data, is a fairly new branch of legal scholarship in the Netherlands. Although it improves the possibilities to measure the effectiveness of legal instruments, it also raises numerous methodological questions, such as a lack of matching empirical data and the translation of legal concepts in socio-empirical terms. Both the pros and cons of the interdisciplinary research method will be addressed and illustrated on the basis of family law research which incorporates socio-empirical data. There are, however, no simple solutions to the pitfalls, but to create awareness of the potential problems may contribute to a better research design and, in the end, to better results.
  •  Title: The Utrecht legal research master: the first five years trans
Author:  Ewoud Hondius
Source:  Universiteit Utrecht
Published in:  Utrecht Law Review
Year:  2011
  •  Title: English-Medium Legal Education in Continental Europe: Maastricht University’s European Law School - Experiences and Challenges trans
Author:  Nicole Kornet
Source:  Universiteit Maastricht
Published in:  Maastricht European Private Law Institute (M-EPLI) Working Paper 18/2011
Year:  2011
Abstract:  Today’s law graduates are facing a world in which the law and the practice of law are undergoing constant transformation as a result of European integration and globalisation. These developments inevitably raise new challenges to legal education, and call for a new generation of European law graduates. This contribution will share the experiences and address the challenges of offering a European-based curriculum through the medium of English. Attention will be given first to the need to educate European law graduates and therefore for the need to ‘Europeanise’ legal education. This is followed by an overview of what a European-based law curriculum could look like. In this context, this contribution will take as a case study the European Law School of Maastricht University. On an individual institutional basis, Maastricht University has taken the bold step to introduce a fully fledged European-based law curriculum aimed at training truly European law graduates in its bachelor programme of the European Law School. This English language track of the European Law School teaches law from a European and comparative perspective from day one, entirely through the medium of English. The contribution will focus on the role of language in that programme, and in particular the experiences with and challenges of teaching an English-medium European-based law curriculum.
  •  Title: Building a European-Oriented Law Curriculum trans
Author:  Nicole Kornet
Source:  Universiteit Maastricht
Published in:  Maastricht European Private Law Institute (M-EPLI) Working Paper 17/2011
Year:  2011
Abstract:  The Europeanisation of law and legal practice calls for the education of a new generation of law graduates; “European” law graduates who are comfortable with different jurisdictions, who can quickly understand a new legal system, who can identify the common European or international origins of divergent national laws and who can solve transnational legal problems. With its focus on national law, the traditional law curriculum is ill-suited to educating such “European” law graduates. Legal education therefore needs to undergo a reorientation, and requires the development of a European-oriented law curriculum taught from a comparative and European perspective. This paper aims to identify some of the building blocks of a European-oriented law curriculum and to illustrate how it can be implemented by looking at Maastricht University’s European Law School - English Language Track.
  •  Title: Teaching Law in Europe: From an Intra-Systemic, Via a Trans-Systemic to a Supra-Systemic Approach trans
Author:  Sjef J. H. M. Van Erp
Source:  Universiteit Maastricht
Published in:  Maastricht European Private Law Institute (M-EPLI) Working Paper 10/2011
Year:  2011
Abstract:  A law curriculum completely devoted to the study of comparative and European law should no longer be looked at with admiration by those who favour the education of European (and no longer: purely national) lawyers or, as the case may be, with suspicion by those who feel themselves threatened by foreign (non-national) influences out of their control. If such a programme combines intra-systemic, trans-systemic and supra-systemic legal teaching it will prepare students for a legal practice which will only become more complex, given the increasing economic (and the resulting legal) integration. Such a practice may be local or international, but in both cases the comparative and European study of law will be a conditio sine qua non for becoming a reliable lawyer.
  •  Title: European Legal Education, or: How to Prepare Students for Global Citizenship? trans
Author:  Jan M. Smits
Source:  Universiteit Maastricht
Published in:  Maastricht European Private Law Institute (M-EPLI) Working Paper 02/2011
Year:  2011
Abstract:  Legal education is gradually moving away from the teaching of national law towards a more European, transnational, or even ‘global’ way of teaching. This paper seeks to explain why an international legal education is to be preferred to a national curriculum and what this means for how law is taught and how law schools are ideally organised. The arguments for an international legal education lie in the increasing plurality of legal sources, the desire to attract students from a larger pool, and the need to give students not only a specialised professional training but also to prepare them for global citizenship. It is claimed students should be exposed to alternative ways of achieving justice, thus creating a dialogue with otherness. This can be done by a focus on the arguments behind the choices made by the relevant authorities and not on the doctrinal intricacies of national legal systems. This type of international curriculum, in which competing conceptions of justice are at the centre of attention, requires a specific teaching method. Two methods seem best suited to allow students to construct their own understanding of legal problems: problem-based learning (PBL) and the Socratic method. In addition, teaching law in an international setting forces us to think through the sequence in which the various jurisdictions come to the fore, the assessment of students and the use of teaching materials and language of instruction. Also discussed are the challenges for the law school as a whole, such as the relationship between teaching and research, the recruitment of faculty and the decreasing relevance of the traditional departmental structure.